SK – Cultural Policy in Saskatchewan

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Saskatchewan Institute of Public Policy – University of Regina

Cultural policy has a history of being relegated to secondary importance or being supported in an ad hoc way by governments in many jurisdictions in North America and around the world. This has occurred despite the fact that there is a growing literature demonstrating the importance of the arts and culture in the economic vitality of places both as a growth sector in itself and as a contributor to quality of life, enhancing population growth and retention.

This paper reviews the various organizations and groups involved in the arts and culture in Saskatchewan, their funding sources, and their relationships. The findings reveal a complex network of “funders” and “producers” of arts and culture. A series of reviews of the sector points to an implicit policy that has been largely reactive, lacking coherent long-term objectives for the sector, and often lacking transparency.

Conclusions are drawn regarding the elements of a framework for developing a cultural policy for the province.

Author(s)

Simon Weseen and M. Rose Olfert

SK - Cultural Policy in Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Institute of Public Policy – University of Regina

Cultural policy has a history of being relegated to secondary importance or being supported in an ad hoc way by governments in many jurisdictions in North America and around the world. This has occurred despite the fact that there is a growing literature demonstrating the importance of the arts and culture in the economic vitality of places both as a growth sector in itself and as a contributor to quality of life, enhancing population growth and retention.

This paper reviews the various organizations and groups involved in the arts and culture in Saskatchewan, their funding sources, and their relationships. The findings reveal a complex network of “funders” and “producers” of arts and culture. A series of reviews of the sector points to an implicit policy that has been largely reactive, lacking coherent long-term objectives for the sector, and often lacking transparency.

Conclusions are drawn regarding the elements of a framework for developing a cultural policy for the province.

Author(s)

Simon Weseen and M. Rose Olfert