Artists should share in resale profits – CBC

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CBC Arts report by Leah Collins

“What Doig’s arguably talking about is a concept known as the Artist Resale Right (ARR) or droit de suite, a term coined in France, where such a royalty scheme has been in play for more than 100 years. The idea itself is as simple as what Doig describes; when artwork is resold, the artist or their estate receives a small portion of what the buyer has paid. And in fact, dozens of countries have legislated the ARR — though the particulars of how it works are a touch different from place to place.

In France, to begin with the O.G. example, droit de suite has been in effect since 1920, and beneficiaries are entitled to a royalty if their work sells on the secondary market. The distribution’s overseen by a special organization called the Association for the Defence of Graphic and Plastic Arts (ADAGP). 

In 2001, the European Union legislated the ARR, and their member countries, including France, base royalty fees on a sliding scale that can be as much as four per cent of the sale price, though they’ve put a cap on how much an artist can earn through the system. (Royalties max out at 12,500 euros.) “

Artists should share in resale profits - CBC

CBC Arts report by Leah Collins

“What Doig’s arguably talking about is a concept known as the Artist Resale Right (ARR) or droit de suite, a term coined in France, where such a royalty scheme has been in play for more than 100 years. The idea itself is as simple as what Doig describes; when artwork is resold, the artist or their estate receives a small portion of what the buyer has paid. And in fact, dozens of countries have legislated the ARR — though the particulars of how it works are a touch different from place to place.

In France, to begin with the O.G. example, droit de suite has been in effect since 1920, and beneficiaries are entitled to a royalty if their work sells on the secondary market. The distribution’s overseen by a special organization called the Association for the Defence of Graphic and Plastic Arts (ADAGP). 

In 2001, the European Union legislated the ARR, and their member countries, including France, base royalty fees on a sliding scale that can be as much as four per cent of the sale price, though they’ve put a cap on how much an artist can earn through the system. (Royalties max out at 12,500 euros.) “